Condensation - Condensation In order to bond the two...

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Condensation In order to bond the two molecules shown below together, you must first remove a hydrogen from each one. This is necessary because carbon has a maximum of 4 bonds and hydrogen can have only one. In biological systems, macromolecules are often formed by removing H from one atom and OH from the other (see the diagram below). The H and the OH combine to form water. Small molecules (monomers) are therefore joined to build macromolecules by the removal of water. The diagram below shows that sucrose (a sugar) can be produced by a condensation reaction of glucose and fructose. Sucrose: This is called a condensation or dehydration reaction. Energy is required to form the bond. Hydrolysis This is a type of reaction in which a macromolecule is broken down into smaller molecules. It is the reverse of condensation (above). Macromolecules and Monomers Many of the common large biological molecules (macromolecules) are synthesized from simpler building blocks (monomers). Each of the types of molecules listed in the table are discussed below.
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Condensation - Condensation In order to bond the two...

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