Organic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry - shorthand formula seen in the upper...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry Introduction Organic molecules are molecules that contain carbon and hydrogen . All living things contain these organic molecules: carbohydrates , lipids , proteins , and nucleic acids . These molecules are often called macromolecules because they may be very large, containing thousands of carbon and hydrogen atoms and because they are typically composed of many smaller molecules bonded together. These four macromolecules will be discussed in the second half of this chapter. . Carbon Carbon has four electrons in its outer shell. Hydrogen has one electron and one proton. Carbon can bond by covalent bonds with as many as 4 other atoms. The diagram above shows a molecule of methane. Lines can be used to represent bonds in the
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: shorthand formula seen in the upper right side of the diagram. Carbon can also form double covalent (shares 2 pairs of electrons) or triple covalent bonds (shares 3 pairs). Carbon can form 4 covalent bonds because it has 4 electrons in its outer shell. It can form the following number of bonds. Notice that in each case below, there is a total of four bonds. 4 single bonds two double bonds one double bond and two single bonds one triple and one single bond Long chains of carbon atoms are common. The chains may be branched or form rings....
View Full Document

Page1 / 2

Organic Chemistry - shorthand formula seen in the upper...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online