2cibbo - It's all about location... Water, water...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: It's all about location... Water, water everywhere... the evolving body all the puzzle pieces 4.211J/11.016J Massachusetts Institute of Technology Spring 2006 Matthew A. Ciborowski Symphony Neighborhood The Once and Future City Matthew Ciborowski ....... 4.211J/11.016J spring 2006 ....... Location Processes History Future Having grown up in and around Boston, I am very familiar with many neighborhoods and historical sites around the city. When faced with the decision of what site to study for this semester’s class, I wanted to find someplace that interested me but that I had not spent a lot of time – no small task! During last semester, I accidentally discovered this area near Symphony Hall while doing a report on Christian Science Plaza; I got hungry and walked down Huntington Street for some food. What I discovered was a vibrant and varied neighborhood quaintly tucked in between two of Boston’s most famous landmarks. What I have deemed for the time being “Symphony Neighborhood” is a blend of mixes and cultures. The site is bordered on the south by Huntington Street, on the north by The Fens, on the west by Forsyth St., Speare Pl. and Opera Pl, and on the east by Massachusetts Avenue and Westland Avenue. Within the bounds of the neighborhood, sits Boston Symphony Hall, as well as residential buildings, Northeastern University dorms and classrooms, as well as small shops and businesses. Perhaps just as interesting are what sits just across the road boundaries I have picked. Across Huntington is the majority of Northeastern University, as well as New England Conservatory and two MTBA rail lines. To the west, the Museum of Fine Arts, The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and Wentworth Institute of Technology. Across Mass Ave sits the Christian Science Plaza, and the intersection of the South End and the Back Bay; and to the north, Olmstead’s park system &nd! ash; The Fens. The neighborhood is influences by many surroundings, as can be seen even without in depth analysis. Symphony Neighborhood is truly a mix of culture, age and style, coming together in a vibrant section of Boston. There are many mysteries of the site that I feel will reveal themselves over time. The site as it currently sits is very well-developed and well-kept. It will be interesting to find out if there is a neighborhood commission, or if Northeastern takes care of most of the street front property. The history of the site will tell me the answers to many puzzles determining ownership of the blocks. From other classes, I know that The Fens and the MFA developed around the same time. How much of an impact did Olmstead and the museum developers have in the design of the neighborhood? Northeastern has been in the location since the turn of the last century, having developed out of the YMCA on Huntington Ave across from Symphony Hall 1. When did the school expand across the Green Line, or did the MBTA cut the school in half during an expansion? The location of Symphony Hall is one the Green Line, or did the MBTA cut the school in half during an expansion?...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course ARCH 4.101 taught by Professor Williamhubbardassn during the Spring '03 term at MIT.

Page1 / 26

2cibbo - It's all about location... Water, water...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online