4_645_week_01

4_645_week_01 - Week 01 - Constructing the Past Giovanni...

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Week 01 - Constructing the Past Giovanni Battista Piranesi: "Ancient Intersection of the Via Appia and Via Ardeatina" Frontispiece, from Le Antichita Romane II. Giovanni Battista Piranesi: "Ancient Circus of Mars with neighbouring monuments viewed from the Via Appia" Frontispiece, from Le Antichita Romane III. Frontispiece of Mausoleum in Museo by Johann Christoph Olearius. 1701. Here the classic image of the pyramid is linked to a new class of antiquities, symbolized by the three piled urns and the shard placed at the base of the pyramid. Connected finds by Leonhard David Hermann. Leonhard David Hermann, in his Maslographia, was one of the first to show connected finds: each object was associated to its context, depending on its state of preservation in the soil. This form of illustration revealed an anatomical interest in deposits. Landscape notes at Stonehenge. Drawn by the British antiquarian and draftsman William Stukeley in 1723. Notes on the lie of the land at Avebury. Drawn by William Stukely in 1724. Overhead view of Avebury. Drawn by William Stukely in 1723. Stukely was to produce an overall plan of Avebury, a Druidical site in Britain, complete with detailed topographic survey. The drawings compel as much by their precision as by their quality.
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Studies of megaliths in and near the village of Aurille (Poitou). Compiled by the Comte de Caylus in 1762. Caylus was one the most enthusiastic, systematic and well-to-do of the antiquaries in France in this period. He was interested in ‘Gallic antiquities', and collected illustrations which he commissioned from the engineers employed on bridges and railways. Studies of megaliths in and near the village of Aurille (Poitou). Compiled by the Comte de Caylus in 1762. Caylus was one the most enthusiastic, systematic and well-to-do of the antiquaries in France in this period. He was interested in ‘Gallic antiquities', and collected illustrations which he commissioned from the engineers employed on bridges and railways. Elevations of Mount Georgovie. Executed for the Comte de Caylus by Dijon, an engineer in the province of Auvergne. The precision of the topographical studies carried out under Caylus' supervision by bridge and highway engineers demonstrates the operation of rigorous standards. Plan of Mount Georgovie. Executed for the Comte de Caylus by Dijon, an engineer in the province of Auvergne. The precision of the topographical studies carried out under Caylus' supervision by bridge and highway engineers demonstrates the operation of rigorous standards. Plan of the amphitheatre at Grand, Lorraine. Made for the Comte de Caylus. Plan of the fountain of Nîmes. Drawn by Damun for the Comte de Caylus. The monument at the site of the spring was discovered in 1738. Roman building known as the Temple of Vasso at Clermont-Ferrand, from Antiquites
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course ARCH 4.500 taught by Professor Lawrencesass during the Fall '08 term at MIT.

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4_645_week_01 - Week 01 - Constructing the Past Giovanni...

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