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lecture_4 - Lecture 4 Alberti's improbable image-making...

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Lecture 4: Alberti's improbable image-making technologies. Transcribed by Kyle Steinfeld. Review: The ability to accurately transmit verbal information in time in space marks the beginning of history. The ability to accurately transmit visual information in time and space marks the beginning of the modern era. The transmission of this information may be described as being either analog[1] or digital[2]. The written alphabet can be seen as a code or algorithm that insures the accurate reproduction of verbal information. It is digital in that information is represented as a sequence of discrete symbols from a finite set, and each copy made is essentially exactly like the original. The alphabet is a replacement for a less efficient analog system of transmitting verbal information: the spoken word. The oral system is an analog method for transmitting verbal information in that some part of the world, like an event, is “recorded” in an individual’s memory which is more mobile in time and space than the event. These two, the event and the record of it, occupy the same level of abstraction: they are both in the world and can altered by the world. They are both analogs of each other. In this system, each copy made will degrade the original data. It is perhaps this instance, this shift from oral to written systems that marks the beginning
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lecture_4 - Lecture 4 Alberti's improbable image-making...

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