lecture_8

lecture_8 - Lecture 8 Final Lecture Transcribed by Yanni...

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Lecture 8: Final Lecture. Transcribed by Yanni Loukissas. From the 15 th to the 19 th century, two mathematical systems for architectural design were in competition in Western Europe. The new system of numeracy allows architects to easily compare measurements and quantities. However, numerical design requires a large amount of bookkeeping because it is difficult to memorize a long string of numeric symbols. Geometry was the tried and tested model. Geometrical constructions are inherently descriptive of the generative process. In contrast to numerical descriptions, this makes geometrical figures easily remembered and reconstructed. However, geometry is a proportional system and therefore makes comparison between separate quantities impossible. The two systems seem to have an equal number of advantages and disadvantages. However, as we in the present already know, the numerical system prevailed. It is unclear what factors lead to its predominance. In this lecture, the professor outlines three possible reasons why numeracy might have appeared more favorable to architects than geometry. First, by the 15 th century many other professions in Europe were educated in the use of numbers. Merchants especially needed numbers to calculate interest rates. Some architects, being
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lecture_8 - Lecture 8 Final Lecture Transcribed by Yanni...

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