TheHaitian Rev

TheHaitian Rev - TheHaitianRevolution 17911804

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         The Haitian Revolution                   1791-1804                                  Dessalines Ripping the White from the Flag,                  by Madsen Mompremier, Gonaives, Haiti, 1995. -Most radical political transformation of the  Age of  Revolution.   -Created the first independent nation to declare all citizens legally equal regardless of race, class and color.  -Only nation in the Atlantic world  where redistribution of land followed  the end of slavery. -Central to our understanding of the  Enlightenment , abolition of slavery in the  Americas, democracy and decolonization. -How do we narrate history? 
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1492- Columbus lands on Ayiti (Taino name for the  island) and renames it La Española (Hispanola).  His ship, the Santa Maria, is grounded on the  shore. From its remains the crew builds the  settlement La Navidad. Columbus returns in 1493  with a massive colonization effort, to find his  settlement destroyed.         Eurocentrism and the Other: “Ceremonie religieuse des habitants de l’Isle Espagnole” (1723) engraving  by Parisian Bernard Picart.  Based on Spanish accounts, it “depicts” a Taino ceremony on Hispaniola.  Taino cemi
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St. Christopher Barbados La Espa ñ ola (Hispaniola) Ile de la Tortue Guadeloupe 1660s -Informal settlement of Hispaniola by French groups of flibustiers and boucaniers  (buccaneers) in the Ile de la Tortue and the north-western part of Hispaniola. 1664- The French appoint Bertrand d’Ogeron (a former navy captain and flibustier) as  governor of Ile de la Tortue. D’Ogeron infiltrates the western coastlines of Hispaniola. By  1680 colonists had founded plantations. 17th Century Map Trinidad & Tobago
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1697 Cartagena is attacked by French  flibustiers, boucaniers and colonists  from St.Domingue. Map (1719) showing the proposed division of the  agreement on boundaries in 1777. The Treaty of Ryswick (Rhyswick)  recognizes France’s claim to the  western third of Hispaniola. Saint Domingue gains official status.  Border
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“Sad irony of human history…The fortunes created at  Bordeaux, at Nantes by the slave-trade, gave to  the bourgeoisie that pride which needed liberty  and contributed to human emancipation.” – Jean Jaur ès, Histoire Socialiste de la Revolution Française, Paris, 1922.    The Marie Seraphique, a slave ship from Nantes (1772-73) “Nantes was the centre of the slave-trade. As early as 1666, 108 ships, went to the coast of Guinea and took on board 
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course UGC 112 taught by Professor Barry during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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TheHaitian Rev - TheHaitianRevolution 17911804

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