LECTURE_16_04-06-10_Chap_14-Hurricanes

LECTURE_16_04-06-10_Chap_14-Hurricanes - Climate/weather...

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Unformatted text preview: Climate/weather Hazards NEW STUFF (Chap. 14) Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Cyclones Formation of Hurricanes and Cyclones ( Review from last Tuesday ) Extratropical Cyclones Noreasters Associated Hazards/Damages-Storm surge-Waves and Winds-Rainfall and Flooding Review Question #1 The oceans are one of the primary water sources that supply water to the water cycle and generate clouds and weather. What percent of the total available water on the planet do the oceans represent? (a) 50% (b) Less than 75% (c) ~97% (d) 45% (e) ~60% KEY POINTS Moisture in the air comes primarily from evaporation from surface water and vegetation. Fig. 10-5, % of total water on Earth Fig. 10-5 % of total water on Earth Water Cycle Review Question #2 What is the primary driving force behind why hurricanes migrate westward across the oceans? (a) Hadley cells (b) Trade wind (c) Jet stream (d) Coriolis effect (e) Ocean circulation Fig. 10-14, p.256 Global Air Circulation westerlies trade Westward track of Hurricanes due to tradewinds ~Fig. 14-14, p. 361 Review Question #3 When clouds or a weather system is pushed over a mountain range, this results in rising, cooling, and loss of moisture in the air mass. What is this referred to as? (a) Jet stream conditions (b) North Atlantic oscillation (c) Coriolis effect (d) Orographic effect (e) El Nino effect Fig. 10-10, p. 253 Orographic effect Air pushed over a mountain rises & cools: orographic effect 14CO, p.351 Hurricanes (Chapter 14) Caribbean native language Hurricane means big wind Hurricane Defined- General Characteristics:- Wind speeds >119 km/per hour (technically considered a hurricane)- Storm may range from 150-800 km in diameter/length- Average travel velocity of 25 km/per hour- Eye of the storm- Wind speeds much slower (15 km/per hour)- Atmospheric pressure lower- Dry air may decent into the eye from the top of the storm- Average travel velocity across the oceans....25 km/per hour- Westward across the oceans because of the trade winds Northern Hemisphere: WestNorthwestNorth New Orleans FLORIDA LOUISIANA MS AB Fig. 14-13, p.361 Cross-section of a typical hurricane ocean ocean Hurricane Defined- General Characteristics:- Wind speeds >119 km/per hour (technically considered a hurricane)- Storm may range from 150-800 km in diameter/length- Average travel velocity of 25 km/per hour- Eye of the storm- Wind speeds much slower (15 km/per hour)...
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LECTURE_16_04-06-10_Chap_14-Hurricanes - Climate/weather...

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