torque

torque - 43 Experiment VI: Static Equilibrium of Rigid...

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43 Experiment VI: Static Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies: Torques Goals Study the relationship between force, lever arm, and torque; study how torques add Study the conditions for static equilibrium of a rigid body Study the concept of “center of gravity” Introduction and Background Torques : The torque t created by a force F with respect to a certain axis of rotation is × = R F t (6-1) where R is the so-called lever arm, which is the perpendicular (shortest) distance between the axis of rotation and the line of force. Torques are vectors. Strictly speaking, the direction of a torque should be perpendicular to (either into or out of) the plane defined by the force and its lever arm. However, for simplicity, we will define the direction of a torque as either clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW) depending which way the torque would make the object rotate about the axis of rotation chosen. Either CW or CCW can be chosen as the “+” direction as long as consistency is maintained. We will choose CW as the “+” direction here. The resultant of multiple torques can then be obtained as the algebraic sum of the individual torques. Static Equilibrium : In order for a rigid body to stay in equilibrium, the net force and the net torque on the object must both be zero. We usually only deal with motion of objects in two dimensions, in which case the conditions for static equilibrium are 0 0 = = y x F F (6-2) 0 = t (6-3) The second condition should hold for any choice of the axis of rotation. Center of Gravity
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torque - 43 Experiment VI: Static Equilibrium of Rigid...

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