Equilibrium

Equilibrium - Equilibrium The vestibule lies between the...

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Unformatted text preview: Equilibrium The vestibule lies between the semicircular canals and the cochlea. It contains two bulblike sacs, the saccule and utricle, whose membranes are continuous with those of the cochlea and semicircular canals, respectively. The saccule and utricle contain receptors that help maintain equilibrium. Equilibrium is maintained in response to two kinds of motion: Static equilibrium maintains the position of the head in response to linear movements of the body, such as starting to walk or stopping. Dynamic equilibrium maintains the position of the head in response to rotational motion of the body, such as rocking (as in a boat) or turning. The perception of equilibrium occurs in the vestibular apparatus. Motion in the following two structures is detected as follows: The vestibule is the primary detector of changes in static equilibrium. A sensory The vestibule is the primary detector of changes in static equilibrium....
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course PT 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Texas State.

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Equilibrium - Equilibrium The vestibule lies between the...

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