The pathway of blood through the chambers and valves of the heart is described as follows

The pathway of blood through the chambers and valves of the heart is described as follows

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The pathway of blood through the chambers and valves of the heart is described as follows (see Figure 1): The right atrium, located in the upper right side of the heart, and a small appendage, the right auricle, act as a temporary storage chamber so that blood will be readily available for the right ventricle. Deoxygenated blood from the systemic circulation enters the right atrium through three veins: the superior vena cava, the inferior vena cava, and the coronary sinus. During the interval when the ventricles are not contracting, blood passes down through the right atrioventricular (AV) valve into the next chamber, the right ventricle. The AV valve is also called the tricuspid valve because it consists of three flexible cusps (flaps). The right ventricle is the pumping chamber for the pulmonary circulation. The ventricle, with walls thicker and more muscular than those of the atrium, contracts and pumps deoxygenated...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online