The three tunics of the eye are described below

The three tunics of the eye are described below - The three...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The three tunics of the eye are described below: Fibrous tunic: The outer fibrous tunic consists of avascular connective tissue called the sclera. The forward 1/6 portion of this tunic is the cornea, a transparent layer of collagen fibers that forms a window for entering light. The remainder of the fibrous tunic is the sclera. Consisting of tough connective tissue, the sclera maintains the shape of the eyeball and provides for the attachment of the eye muscles. The visible forward portion of the sclera is the white of the eye. Vascular tunic: The middle vascular tunic (uvea) consists of three highly vascularized (as the name implies), pigmented parts (the iris, the ciliary body, and the choroid): The iris is the colored portion of the eye that opens and closes to control the size of its circular opening, the pupil. The size of the pupil regulates the amount of size of its circular opening, the pupil....
View Full Document

Page1 / 2

The three tunics of the eye are described below - The three...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online