Anatomy of the Kidneys

Anatomy of the Kidneys - Anatomy of the Kidneys

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Anatomy of the Kidneys Understanding how the urinary system helps maintain homeostasis by removing harmful substances  from the blood and regulating water balance in the body is an important part of physiology. Your  kidneys, which are the main part of the urinary system, are made up of millions of nephrons that act  as individual filtering units and are complex structures themselves. The ureters, urethra, and urinary  bladder complete this intricate system. The urinary system helps maintain homeostasis by regulating water balance and by removing  harmful substances from the blood. The blood is filtered by two kidneys, which produce urine, a fluid  containing toxic substances and waste products. From each kidney, the urine flows through a tube,  the ureter, to the urinary bladder, where it is stored until it is expelled from the body through another  tube, the urethra. The kidneys are surrounded by three layers of tissue: 
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course PT 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Texas State.

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