Paper 3 - Notes According to Paul Starrs third chapter,...

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Unformatted text preview: Notes According to Paul Starrs third chapter, Americas First Information Revolution, in his Creation in the Media book, information and communication in the United States was much different than it is today. After Americas independence as a nation, there were institutions that were created for the advantage of political parties. However, the United States felt it necessary and important for the citizens of their country to understand the role that the government played through the knowledge of history and past historical events and the means of communication. Communication was key for Americans to gain that essential knowledge and it was provided to them through the advent of newspapers and postal services. The process of newspapers and similar press was a long one and there were many ups and downs that occurred in regards to cost and information availability. Around the time of the American Revolution, information was scarce, communication prices were extremely high and the public was limited. By the early 19 th century, however, there was a public expansion, sources to gain knowledge grew more readily available and broad and the once very high costs had dropped. These changes that took place largely attributed to those decisions made by political parties at the time. There are similarities as to what we see today in print and back in the early republic. There were many indirect and direct stabs that people were taking at each other over matters such as personal reputation. Joanne Freeman, a historian quoted in the chapter, coined the phrase, grammar of political combat, to allude to these quarrels. For a better understanding, politicians would use words as weapons to attack their enemies and/or support their friends. It wasnt until the 1830s when the development of democracy in print was finally underway. Political leaders took on a major role in this development of newspapers and partisan work was seen abundantly. With the end of the American Revolution, printing presses started to increase a rapid rate. With the end of the American Revolution, printing presses started to increase a rapid rate....
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Paper 3 - Notes According to Paul Starrs third chapter,...

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