Reader Response Poetry The Snowman

Reader Response Poetry The Snowman - the wide open and...

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Krista Ammons Reader Response Wallace Stevens poem “The Snow Man,” first made me think that I was about to read a poem about a regular snow man that we all made when we were kids. You remember the mounds of snow piled high stacked upon each other, with a carrot nose, and coal for eyes. I can’t say that I’m disappointed to not have read a poem about this ordinary snow man that you see every year around the first snow fall. Stevens uses the title I think to draw in the reader or maybe even give the reader a false notion of what the poem is actually about. I see Stevens talking about a persons mind being one with nature and not seeing just the ordinary things that most of us see on a winter’s day. The first line says, “One must have a mind of winter” (1), meaning almost being like nature, enduring/understanding all the hardships of the cold, frosty days and harsh nights. The poem makes me visualize a man sitting in the snow in the woods alone staring out into
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Unformatted text preview: the wide open and listening to the rustling of the trees, not knowing what is real or what is not. The speaker of the poem does not bring into the poem his own thoughts or emotions, this is the speaker, Who listens in the snow/And, nothing himself, beholds/Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is (13-15). This last line has to be my favorite of the entire poem. I think that it is my favorite because it puts things into perspective for me. I first felt the poem as being cold and almost full of misery, most likely because the poem began with the thought of cold and frost covering nature, making me think of the winter actually killing nature. In the end the last lines made me feel at ease with the cold knowing that the reader was also okay with it and not sad, but just becoming one in the nature aspect of things....
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course ENGLISH 333 taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '06 term at University of Tennessee.

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