Othello1 - Othello By William Shakespeare Day 1 Act 1 The...

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Othello By William Shakespeare Day 1, Act 1 The setting of Act 1 begins in the dark streets of Venice. The characters Iago and Roderigo are introduced. The two deceive Brabantio by telling him that his daughter Desdemona has eloped with Othello. Brabantio then goes out after Othello. The setting switches to an inn called the Sagittary. Iago then warns Othello of Brabantio's anger, but this does not worry Othello for he truly loves Desdemona. Cassio, Othello's attendant, arrives with news that Othello must meet with the duke and senators immediately. Brabantio arrives just as Othello is leaving, so Brabantio decides to go with him to present the case of his daughter's theft to the duke. The charges against Othello are presented to the duke, and he asks for proof. They send for Desdemona and she tells them she married Othello for love. Othello must then report to Cyprus, along with Desdemona under Iago's care. Roderigo is desperate for Desdemona's love and threatens suicide. Iago tells Roderigo to sell all his land, disguise himself, and purse Desdemona in Cyprus. Some things I noticed about the characters. Iago is completely two faced. He is Othello's ancient yet hates Othello because Cassio was named lieutenant instead of him. He is sarcastic about the situation when talking to Roderigo. "This countercaster, he, in good time, must his lieutenant be, and I, God bless the mark, his Moorship's ancient (9)." He also mentions that Cassio never saw battle and that "preferment goes by letter and affection (9)." He even admits to caring only for himself and that his service to Othello was just a show (11). "I am not what I am (11)." (Oh yeah-he seems to swear a lot too!) He tells Roderigo he hates Othello, yet warns Othello of Brabantio and says "he prated and spoke such scurvy and provoking terms against your honor. (21)" Iago does not really act like a true friend to Roderigo as well when he says "put money in thy purse" over and over again. He is using Roderigo to try and break up the marriage to get back at Othello for not naming him as lieutenant. (Looks like we have a conflict.) Roderigo seems to soak up everything Iago tells him simply because he is a love sick puppy. He only wants Desdemona. He even threatened suicide after he knew she was truly married (139). Othello comes across as a "good ole boy" to me. When Brabantio and his men approached drawing their swords, Othello said "Keep up your bright swords for the dew will rust them. Good signor, you shall more command with years than with your weapons (25)." He also thinks Iago is a "man of honesty and trust (49)", yeah right. My dad would be upset if I ran away and got married, so Brabantio has every right to be angry. One thing he said made me think though. "Look to her, Moor, of thou hast eyes to see. She has deceived her father, and may thee (49)." Could this be foreshadowing? I like Desdemona so far because she brings in the love story. She fell in love with a true "knight in shining armor". Not only that but she ran away and left her family for him! ( I love a good love story J ) I also liked how the duke seemed to be on the lover's side too.
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