Head - Head-tail radio galaxies are often found in...

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Head-tail radio galaxies are often found in clusters. These are heavily distorted double sources that exhibit a swept-back appearance. The most promising explanation for this is motion of the galaxy with respect to an external medium, and bending of low-velocity radio jets by ram pressure of the external medium (Begelman et al 1979 Nature 279, 770). The type examples are 3C 129, NGC 1265, and IC 310 (there are three in the Perseus cluster alone). From O'Dea and Owen 1986 (ApJ 301, 841, courtesy of the AAS), here is a detailed view of the inner parts of the radio source in NGC 1265. The prominent flares in each tail may represent transitions from the ISM to the surrounding material in the cluster. Knowing statistically what galaxy speeds in clusters are, we could deduce the density of the ICM if we knew the jet speed and density - the big problem. Also, other mechanisms for bending have been considered (Jones and Owen 1979 ApJ 234, 818). Detailed radio maps favor the less direct interpretation of ISM distortions induced by ram pressure, but not uniquely. We just need to
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Head - Head-tail radio galaxies are often found in...

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