Quasars have been a much harder problem

Quasars have been a much harder problem - Quasars have been...

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Quasars have been a much harder problem - if you could see the host galaxy, it wouldn't be quasistellar. Fuzz has long been observed around low-redshift QSOs with about the right size and luminosity for a surrounding galaxy (Kristian 1973 ApJLett 179, L129; Gehren et al 1984 ApJ 278, 11; Hutchings et al 1984 ApJSuppl 55, 319; Malkan 1984 ApJ 287, 555). Such fuzz is detectable for most QSOs at z < 0.4 by now. Spectroscopic confirmation that these are galaxies containing (more or less) normal stars has been difficult, because the fuzz is of low surface brightness and close to a strong point source. First attempts found extended emission lines (Wampler et al 1975 ApJ 198,249, Richstone and Oke 1977 ApJ 213, 6; Stockton 1976 ApJLett 205, 115. ..) Stellar absorption features (from a fairly young population) were clearly found around 3C 48 by Boroson and Oke (1982 Nature 296, 391). Several more cases have now been observed, all at the QSO redshift (Boroson and Oke 1984 ApK 281, 535; Boroson and Green 1982 ApJ 263, 32; Balick and Heckman 1983 ApJLett 265, L1; Boroson et al. 1985 ApJ 293,
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Quasars have been a much harder problem - Quasars have been...

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