The history of the collapse

The history of the collapse - The history of the collapse,...

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The history of the collapse, as in star formation, will be greatly influenced by cooling of the material; strong radiative cooling will hasten the collapse and give a more compact final configuration. Recall here the peculiar behavior of hot gas in cooling flows as an example. For example, Lake 1990 (ApJLett 364, L1) considers different kinds of galaxies (dwarfs, spirals, ellipticals) to result from different ratios of dynamical, cooling, and Hubble times, together with whether cooling at the relevant densities does or does not become more efficient at lower temperature. His Fig. 1d (shown by permission of the AAS) superimposed a cooling curve on the approximate temperature distributions of spirals and ellipticals, showing that this is at least plausible if we take a characteristic temperature from present-epoch global dynamics: Assorted applications of the gas cooling function can be found throughout studies of galaxy formation. Peacock points to Blumenthal et al. 1984 (Nature 311, 517), who point out that
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The history of the collapse - The history of the collapse,...

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