csmc - Analysis of the Intended Mathematics Curriculum as...

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Unformatted text preview: Analysis of the Intended Mathematics Curriculum as Represented in State-Level Standards: Consensus or Confusion? Barbara J. Reys Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum The intended curriculum: What mathematics should students learn and when should they learn it? No Child Left Behind (2001) Each state is required to:- adopt challenging academic content standards that will be used by the State, its local educational agencies, and its schools.- measure the achievement of students in mathematics against the standards in each of grades 3 through 8. Prior to NCLB, many states did not have curriculum standards that specified mathematics that students should learn (and what teachers should teach) at each grade level. Publication of State-Level Mathematics Curriculum Standards (as of May 2006) 2006 4 states 2005 9 states 2004 13 states 2003 8 states 2002 4 states 2001 4 states 2000 2 states pre-2000 7 states (FL, 1999) Increased Specificity, Authority, and Influence For many states, their most recent curriculum standards represent increased specificity of learning expectations compared to previous standards. The standards carry additional weight or influence since they are tied to NCLB-mandated annual assessments in grades 3-8. Teachers and state department leaders acknowledge the increased influence of state standards in determining curriculum focus at the classroom level. http://www.mathcurriculumcenter.org/states.php GLE documents describe mathematics learning expectations for specific grades 42 states have GLE documents Most common grades: K-8 (37 states) Others: K-7, 3-8 or 3-10 (5 states) Grade-Level Learning Expectations (GLEs) To what extent are the elementary and middle (K-8) grade-level learning expectations described in state-level mathematics curriculum standards similar in terms of content and grade placement? Analysis of State GLEs Elementary and middle school documents produced by 42 states. Not a comprehensive analysis. Not evaluative. Descriptive. Chose particular topics within specific strands for analysis (number, algebra, reasoning). Utilized an organic or bottom-up approach with learning expectations as the unit of analysis. Differences in GLE Documents Organization of GLEs Language used to describe learning expectations. Level of specificity or grain size of learning expectations. Grade placement of key topics. Example of Variation of GLEs (Basic Number Combinations) Know the addition facts (sums to 20) and the corresponding subtraction facts and commit them to memory. (CA, gr. 1) States and uses with efficiency and accuracy basic addition facts with sums from 0 to 20 and corresponding subtraction facts. (KS, gr. 2) Recalls (from memory) the addition facts and corresponding subtraction facts. (FL, gr. 2) Recall basic addition and subtraction facts through 18....
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csmc - Analysis of the Intended Mathematics Curriculum as...

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