HistoryofMaths

HistoryofMaths - The History of Mathematics

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The History of Mathematics http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/BiogIndex.html http://www.math.wichita.edu/~richardson/timeline.html http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Indexes/HistoryTopics.html x 2 + 10 x = 39 x 2 + 10 x + 4 25 / 4 = 39+25 (x+5) 2 = 64 x + 5 = 8 x = 3 a l-Khwa rizm i Ira q (c a . 780-850) Completing a Square Solving a Quadratic Equation In Ko nig s b e rg , G e rm a ny, a rive r ra n thro ug h the c ity s uc h tha t in its c e ntre wa s a n is la nd, a nd a fte r pa s s ing the is la nd, the rive r b ro ke into two pa rts . S e ve n b ridg e s we re b uilt s o tha t the pe o ple o f the c ity c o uld g e t fro m o ne pa rt to a no the r. The pe o ple wo nde re d whe the r o r no t o ne c o uld wa lk a ro und the c ity in a wa y tha t wo uld invo lve c ro s s ing e a c h b ridg e e xa c tly o nc e The Bridges of Konigsberg Topology Leonhard Euler Switzerland 1707 - 1783 T h e c i t y Theorem: There are infinitely many prime numbers. Proof: Suppose the opposite, that is, that there are a finite number of prime numbers. Call them p 1 , p 2 , p 3 , p 4 ,.... ,p n . Now consider the number (p 1 *p 2 *p 3 *...*p n )+1 Every prime number, when divided into this number, leaves a remainder of one. So this number has no prime factors (remember, by assumption, it's not prime itself). This is a contradiction. Thus there must, in fact, be infinitely many primes. Infinite Prime Numbers Euclid Greece 325 265BC The Search for Pi Person/People Year Value Babylonians ~2000 B.C. 3 1/8 Egyptians ~2000 B.C. (16/9)^2= 3.1605 Archimedes- Italy ~300 B.C. proves 3 10/71<Pi<3 1/7 uses 211875/67441=3.14163 Ptolemy- Greece ~200 A.D. 377/120=3.14166. .. Tsu Chung-Chi - China ~500 A.D. proves 3.1415926<Pi<3.1415929 Aryabhatta- Indian ~500 3.1416 Fibonacci- Italy 1220 3.141818 Ludolph van Ceulen - German 1596 Calculates Pi to 35 decimal places Machin- England 1706 100 decimal places CDC 6600 1967 500,000 decimal places Franois Vite (1540-1603) France - determined that: John Wallis (1616-1703) English - showed that: While Euler (1707-1783) Switzerland derived his famous formula: Today Pi is known to more than 10 billion decimal places. The Search for Pi Ancient Babylonia The Sumerians had developed an abstract form of writing based on cuneiform (i.e. wedge-shaped) symbols. Their symbols were written on wet clay tablets which were baked in the hot sun and many thousands of these tablets have survived to this day. It was the use of a stylus on a clay medium that led to the use of cuneiform symbols since curved lines could not be drawn. The later Babylonians adopted the same style of cuneiform writing on clay tablets. The Babylonians had an advanced number system, in some ways more advanced than our present systems. It was a ways more advanced than our present systems....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course MATH 112 taught by Professor Jarvis during the Winter '08 term at BYU.

Page1 / 63

HistoryofMaths - The History of Mathematics

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online