keynote_black

keynote_black - Assessment for Learning Where is it Now?...

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1 Assessment for Learning Where is it Now? Where is it Going? Paul Black Department of Education King’s College London
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2 Hitting the Headlines 1998 Inside the Black Box. 20-page booklet. ~ 50 000 sold. 1999 - 2001 KMOFAP work: teachers invent the practice. 2002 King’s team: Working Inside the Black Box 24 page  booklet~ 45 000 sold. 2002  KS3 DfES initiative stresses Assessment for Learning. 2003 King’s  team: Assessment for Learning book  2 reprints. WHY : what did we do right ?
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3 Where is it now ? The Revival : It’s worth doing Implementation : How it’s done Hitting the headlines Others can do it too or can they ? Old wine in new bottles ? Why it matters ?
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4 The Revival: It’s worth doing Experimental and control groups, pre-and post-tests, numerical data on learning gains About 30 studies found All show gains: effect sizes 0.4 to 0.7 Sometimes “low attainers” show largest gains Variety of approaches to formative Lack detail – they don’t ( can’t ?) tell you what to do
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5 The Revival: It’s worth doing Many rigorous studies show that standards are raised by formative assessment. The positive effect is greater as the range of the formative feedback is expanded. King’s project work with schools Standards were raised Teachers happy about the way they had changed
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6 Implementation: How it’s done An assessment activity can help learning if it provides information to be used as feedback , by teachers, and by their students, in assessing themselves and each other , to modify the teaching and learning activities in which they are engaged. Feedback is two-way Student to teacher Teacher to student Feedback can be oral or written short term or medium term
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7 Implementation: How it’s done The main strategies Questioning and dialogue Oral feedback Comment only marking Feedback on written work Self- and peer-assessment Developing group discussion Formative use of tests
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8 Implementation: Questioning I’d become dissatisfied with the closed Q&A style that my unthinking teaching had fallen into, and I would frequently be lazy in my acceptance of right answers and sometimes even tacit complicity with a class to make sure none of us had to work too hard … They and I knew that if the Q&A wasn’t going smoothly, I’d change the question, answer it myself or only seek answers from the ‘brighter students’. There must have been times (still are?) where an outside observer would see my lessons as a small discussion group surrounded by many sleepy onlookers. James, Two Bishops School
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course MATH 112 taught by Professor Jarvis during the Winter '08 term at BYU.

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keynote_black - Assessment for Learning Where is it Now?...

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