partialproducts2

partialproducts2 - More partial products More Recall that...

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More partial products More partial products Recall that we can use a drawing of a rectangle to help us with calculating products. The rectangle is divided into regions and we determine “partial products” which are then added to find the total.
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More partial products More partial products Recall that we can use a drawing of a rectangle to help us with calculating products. The rectangle is divided into regions and we determine “partial products” which are then added to find the total. 3 7 Blue 3 × 5 = 15 Yellow 3 × 2 = 6 Total = 21 Example 1:
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More partial products More partial products Example 2: The total number of squares can be found from 54 × 23. One of the ways to calculate 54 × 23 is to divide the rectangle into 4 regions Orange: 50 x 20 = 1000 Yellow: 4 x 20 = 80 White: 50 x 3 = 150 Blue: 4 x 3 = 12 Total: 1242 So 54 × 23 = 1242
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More partial products More partial products Now we are going to extend this technique of partial products with decimal numbers. Draw a rectangle and label the sides with 2 and 4.
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More partial products More partial products Now we are going to extend this technique of partial products with decimal numbers. Draw a rectangle and label the sides with 2 and 4. We know 2 × 4 = 8 2 4
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More partial products More partial products Now we are going to extend this technique of partial products with decimal numbers. Draw a rectangle and label the sides with 2 and 4. We know 2 × 4 = 8 2 4 What if we need to find 2 × 4.7? Can we draw another small region on the right?
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More partial products Now we are going to extend this technique of partial products with decimal numbers. Draw a rectangle and label the sides with 2 and 4.
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course MATH 112 taught by Professor Jarvis during the Winter '08 term at BYU.

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partialproducts2 - More partial products More Recall that...

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