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Presentation1 - Immigration in America: Understanding the...

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Unformatted text preview: Immigration in America: Understanding the Numbers This presentation is available at http://www.macalester.edu/~bressoud/talks June 2125, 2004 David Bressoud, Mathematics, Macalester College Kathy Fennelly, Immigration & Public Policy, Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, U MN Steve Holland, Economics & Political Science, Macalester College literate adj. 1. Able to read and write 2. Educated, knowledgeable literate adj. 1. Able to read and write 2. Educated, knowledgeable numerate adj. 1. Able to do arithmetic and simple geometry 2. Educated, knowledgeable Quantitatively literate citizenship: Understand comparative magnitudes of risk and significance of very small numbers (10 ppm) Understand that unusual events can easily occur by chance (eg. Cancer clusters) Analyze economic and demographic data to support or oppose policy proposals Understand difference between rates of change and changes in rates, between average and marginal rates, and between linear and exponential rates of growth Appreciate common sources of bias in surveys "Numeracy is not the same as mathematics, nor is it an alternative to mathematics. Rather, it is an equal and supporting partner in helping students learn to cope with the quantitative demands of modern society. Whereas mathematics is a well-established discipline, numeracy is necessarily interdisciplinary. Like writing, numeracy must permeate the curriculum. When it does, also like writing, it will enhance students' understanding of all subjects and their capacity to lead informed lives." Lynn Arthur Steen, Mathematics and Democracy: The Case for Quantitative Literacy, NCED, 2001. "Numeracy is not the same as mathematics, nor is it an alternative to mathematics. Rather, it is an equal and supporting partner in helping students learn to cope with the quantitative demands of modern society. Whereas mathematics is a well-established discipline, numeracy is necessarily interdisciplinary. Like writing, numeracy must permeate the curriculum. When it does, also like writing, it will enhance students' understanding of all subjects...
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Presentation1 - Immigration in America: Understanding the...

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