Soro - GIRLS AND BOYS AND EQUITY IN Soro EWM EACHERS 1...

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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 1 GIRLS AND BOYS AND EQUITY IN MATHEMATICS: TEACHERS’ BELIEFS
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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 2
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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 3 THE ABC of NUMERACY riitta@soro.fi
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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 4 A basic belief underlying this presentation is that females’ social learning and beliefs about themselves with regard to mathematics are different from those of males. The entire field of mathematics might be enriched if more young females were given the opportunity to grow into mathematical scholars and give their unique contribution.
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University of Turku Department of Mathematics retrieved from http://www.math.utu.fi/henkilokunta/ Male Female Professors 6 Docents 22 Lecturers 8 Senior Assistants 6 Assistants 2 Total 44 5 1 4
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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 6 Females have not elected to participate in advanced mathematics courses or in mathematics- related careers at the same level as males have. Girls tend to underestimate their math ability in school, even though their actual performance is as good as or better than that of the boys. Mathematics has been and continues to be a critical filter to careers and occupations, which are interesting, challenging, have high status, and are usually well-paid.
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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 7 Elizabeth Fennema: “Mathematics is a unique product of human culture. Permitting females to understand this culture is important both for their own appreciation of the beauty of mathematics and the transmission of this culture to future generations.” Fennema, E. 1995. Mathematics, Gender and Research. In B. Grevholm & G. Hanna (eds.) Gender and Mathematics Education. Lund: Lund University Press, 21-38.
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Defining Equity
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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 9 equity justice according to natural law or right; specifically: freedom from bias or favouritism equality equal (1): of the same measure, quantity, amount, or number as another 2): identical in mathematical value or logical denotation In this presentation the word equity is used instead of equality . In some aspects "equality" is not synonymous with "equity“. Thus, rather than striving for equality in the meaning of ‘sameness’ amongst girls and boys, teachers should promote equity which reflects the needs and strengths of both groups. Merriam-Webster On-Line Dictionary:
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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 10 What is gender equity (equality)? Council of Europe defines: Gender equality means an equal visibility, empowerment and participation of both sexes in all spheres of public and private life. Gender equality is the opposite of gender inequality, not of gender difference.
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Soro EWM 2009 Turku 11 Gender equity in mathematics education Judgements on educational equity have been based on three different definitions of equality: (1) equal opportunity (2) equal treatment (3) equal outcome.
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EWM 2009 Turku 12 (1) equal opportunity Many teachers believe that equity has been reached since there are no formal borders and the co-educational school system provides equal opportunity to elect mathematics. However there are far more boys than girls in
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course MATH 220 taught by Professor Kearn during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Soro - GIRLS AND BOYS AND EQUITY IN Soro EWM EACHERS 1...

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