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Cultural Studies Now Conference, UEL, 20 July 2007 Absolute Cultures: Mathematics Education Meets Cultural  Studies Debbie Epstein, Heather Mendick and Marie-Pierre Moreau
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Cultural Studies Now Conference, UEL, 20 July 2007 pie/pi Ellie: “Yes I was talking about my friend who was the maths geek.  He  came back this summer and he has got like the pi symbol and it’s about  an inch big tattooed on like the underside of his wrist.  Everyone was  telling me he had ‘pi’ and I was thinking, ‘why has he got a pie tattooed  on his wrist?’ And I was thinking, ‘what kind of pie would it be and why  would you think let’s have a pie?’  And then everyone was like ‘what are  you on about – pi you know’ and I was like ‘oh!’.  But he thinks it is like  the best thing ever, so much so that he has had it now permanently  tattooed on him. [laughter] You wouldn’t go and get Marx you know ‘I  really like Marx let’s have him tattooed’ or something like that you know.” [Meitner, Russell Group university, Focus group 25, social sciences  undergraduate]
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Cultural Studies Now Conference, UEL, 20 July 2007 The study: our research questions What discourses are there about mathematics and  mathematicians within contemporary popular cultural  representations? How are these discourses deployed by learners in constructing  their relationships with mathematics?  How are these discourses and processes classed, gendered  and raced? 
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Cultural Studies Now Conference, UEL, 20 July 2007 Why explore this issue? The policy argument: fewer and fewer young people are choosing  to do maths post GCSE in England and Wales, similar trends in  other countries The culture argument: more and more mathematics and  mathematicians are appearing within popular culture (Numb3rs,  sudokus, geek chic etc.) The social justice argument: strong association between  mathematics and identities and evidence that this is classed,  gendered and raced The personal argument: relationships – experience ‘watch TV and call it work’
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Cultural Studies Now Conference, UEL, 20 July 2007 Have we been doing a  cultural study? Our research has not been  conventional CS but has drawn on  insights and methods from the  Birmingham School (Centre for  Contemporary Cultural Studies) in its: Attention to the circulation of popular  understandings/discourses Concern with the popular Interest in the making of meaning
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Cultural Studies Now Conference, UEL, 20 July 2007    What have we done? 2 groups of participants: 
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course MATH 220 taught by Professor Kearn during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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t75567_4 -...

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