York sem OntarioRes 05

York sem OntarioRes 05 - RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION...

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Seminar in History and Philosophy of Mathematics and Mathematics Education Margaret Sinclair, February 4, 2005 RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION – ONTARIO 2005
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Mathematics Education Research Who does it? Why is it necessary? What are the major areas of research? What are the methods?
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Major areas Research on how people learn, and how they learn particular math concepts (e.g.,percent); Research on attitudes and beliefs; Research on the classroom environment – role of the teacher, use of manipulatives, place of technology, role of communication, impact of group work, methods of assessment; Research on broader issues – at risk learners, teacher preparation and PD, transitions, govt. policies, use of math in particular fields.
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Research Methods Informal observations/data collection Action research by classroom teachers; Data collecting by university departments. Qualitative studies Interviews, classroom observations/recordings; Analysis of writing samples, survey questions; Experiments with - manipulatives, pedagogical methods, technological applications. Quantitative studies Large scale surveys; Analysis of data (e.g., EQAO, TIMSS) Mixed method studies
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Some Important Research Themes in Ontario Understanding mathematics Teacher learning Technology Transitions Impacts of program initiatives “At risk” learners
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Understanding mathematics 3 2 5 4 × How can we explain an idea more clearly? What does this mean?
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Understanding mathematics Mathematics as story . How does context affect students’ attitudes, motivation, understanding of mathematical ideas? G. Gadanidis – UWO. The aesthetic in mathematics . There is beauty in mathematics itself. How can we use it? N. Sinclair, W. Higginson – Queen’s.
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Understanding mathematics Diagrammatic reasoning and 'proofs’ - What is the role of diagrams in formal and informal reasoning? in problem solving by students and researchers? in recall of mathematics? in texts? W. Whiteley – York. Visual thinking - How do people learn to change what they see so that their visual thinking is more effective. W. Whiteley –York.
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Understanding mathematics Rational numbers. Does using percents in linear measurement foster an understanding of rational-number operations? J. Moss – Institute of Child Study, UT. Gestures in mathematics. What is the relationship between gestures, speech, and signs in mathematics? L. Radford – Laurentian. Proof. What are the pedagogical aspects of proof? G. Hanna – OISE/UT.
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Understanding mathematics Rich learning tasks. Developing tasks that help students make connections. G. Flewelling; W. Higginson – Queen’s. Creative experiences
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York sem OntarioRes 05 - RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION...

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