Exp1_Question_Final - EXPERIMENTAL PROBLEM 1 DETERMINATION...

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EXPERIMENTAL PROBLEM 1 DETERMINATION OF THE WAVELENGTH OF A DIODE LASER MATERIAL In addition to items 1), 2) and 3), you should use: 4) A lens mounted on a square post (LABEL C). 5) A razor blade in a slide holder to be placed in acrylic support, (LABEL D1) and mounted on sliding rail (LABEL D2). Use the screwdriver to tighten the support if necessary. See photograph for mounting instructions. 6) An observation screen with a caliper scale (1/20 mm) (LABEL E). 7) A magnifying glass (LABEL F). 8) 30 cm ruler (LABEL G). 9) Caliper (LABEL H). 10) Measuring tape (LABEL I). 11) Calculator. 12) White index cards, masking tape, stickers, scissors, triangle squares set. 13) Pencils, paper, graph paper. Razor blade in a slide holder to be placed in acrylic support (LABEL D1) and mounted on sliding rail (LABEL D2).
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You are asked to determine a diode laser wavelength. The particular feature of this measurement is that no exact micrometer scales (such as prefabricated diffraction gratings) are used. The smallest lengths measured are in the millimetric range. The wavelength is determined using light diffraction on a sharp edge of a razor blade. Figure 1.1 Typical interference fringe pattern. Once the laser beam (A) is reflected on the mirror (B), it must be made to pass through a lens (C), which has a focal length of a few centimeters . It can now be assumed that the focus is a light point source from which a spherical wave is emitted. After the lens, and along its path, the laser beam hits a sharp razor blade edge as an obstacle. This can be considered to be a light source from which a cylindrical wave is emitted. These two waves interfere with each other, in the forward direction, creating a diffractive pattern that can be observed on a screen. See Figure 1.1 with a photograph of a typical pattern. There are two important cases, see Figures 1.2 and 1.3.
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Exp1_Question_Final - EXPERIMENTAL PROBLEM 1 DETERMINATION...

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