ch06 - Engineering Mechanics: Statics Chapter 6: Structural...

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Unformatted text preview: Engineering Mechanics: Statics Chapter 6: Structural Analysis Chapter Objectives To show how to determine the forces in the members of a truss using the method of joints and the method of sections. To analyze the forces acting on the members of frames and machines composed of pin- connected members. Chapter Outline Simple Trusses The Method of Joints Zero-Force Members The Method of Sections Space Trusses Frames and Machines 6.1 Simple Trusses A truss is a structure composed of slender members joined together at their end points Joint connections are formed by bolting or welding the ends of the members to a common plate, called a gusset plate, or by simply passing a large bolt or pin through each of the members 6.1 Simple Trusses Planar Trusses Planar trusses lie on a single plane and are used to support roofs and bridges The truss ABCD shows a typical roof-supporting truss Roof load is transmitted to the truss at joints by means of a series of purlins, such as DD 6.1 Simple Trusses Planar Trusses The analysis of the forces developed in the truss members is 2D 6.1 Simple Trusses Planar Trusses For a bridge, the load on the deck is first transmitted to the stringers, then to the floor beams, and finally to the joints B, C and D of the two supporting trusses Like the roof truss, the bridge truss loading is also coplanar 6.1 Simple Trusses Planar Trusses When bridge or roof trusses extend over large distances, a rocker or roller is commonly used for supporting one end, Eg: joint E This type of support allows freedom for expansion or contraction of the members due to temperature or application of loads 6.1 Simple Trusses Assumptions for Design 1. All loadings are applied at the joint Assumption true for most applications of bridge and roof trusses Weight of the members neglected since forces supported by the members are large in comparison If members weight is considered, apply it as a vertical force, half of the magnitude applied at each end of the member 6.1 Simple Trusses Assumptions for Design 2. The members are joined together by smooth pins Assumption true when bolted or welded joints are used, provided the center lines of the joining members are concurrent 6.1 Simple Trusses Assumptions for Design Each truss member acts as a two force member, therefore the forces at the ends must be directed along the axis of the member If the force tends to elongate the member, it is a tensile force If the force tends to shorten the member, it is a compressive force 6.1 Simple Trusses6....
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course STATICS 001 taught by Professor Statics during the Three '11 term at ADFA.

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ch06 - Engineering Mechanics: Statics Chapter 6: Structural...

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