HU_Recitation # 9_Solution Sheet

HU_Recitation # 9_Solution Sheet - HOWARD UNIVERSITY PHYS...

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HOWARD UNIVERSITY PHYS 001-RECITATON ASSIGNMENT # 9 Chapter 9- Torque and Rotational Equilibrium Torque Torque causes an object to rotate. It depends on the force and the point at which the force is applied relative to the axis of rotation. Specifically, torque is the product of the force and the nearest distance between the line of action of the force and the axis or rotation , Fd = τ (units are N-m) If r is the distance from the point of application of the force to the pivot, then d = r (called the ‘lever arm’). We can also write r F = where F = F sin φ is the component of F that is perpendicular to r. The torque due to the force shown in the diagram would produce a counter-clockwise rotation about the pivot and is assumed to be positive . A torque that would produce a clockwise rotation is negative. Rotational Equilibrium An object is in equilibrium if both the net force and net torque on it are zero. Thus, for equilibrium = 0 F 1 st condition for equilibrium = 0 2 nd condition for equilibrium (Note: The location of the axis of rotation is arbitrary when the object is in equilibrium.) 1 | P a g e F φ r F = F sin φ F = F cos φ pivot
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Part I. Express your understanding of the concept of lever arm by answering the following
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course PHYSICS 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Howard.

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HU_Recitation # 9_Solution Sheet - HOWARD UNIVERSITY PHYS...

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