CH3_Chemical_Formulas_and_The_Mole_Concept_Study_Guide

CH3_Chemical_Formulas_and_The_Mole_Concept_Study_Guide -...

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Unformatted text preview: Name: ___________________________________ CH101 Chemical Formulas and the Mole Concept – Study Guide sections 3.7, 3.8 and 3.9 in the textbook Molar Mass (section 3.7) The molar mass of a compound is defined as ____________________________________________. The units commonly used to express molar mass are _______________________. How is the molar mass of a compound related to its formula mass? How are they similar? How are they different? How would you calculate the molar mass of a compound? What is the molar mass of Ca(NO3)2? The molar mass of a compound can be used as a conversion factor to convert between ___________ and _______________. (ans. 164.10 g/mole) Mass % of an element = ___________________ x 100% Chemical Formulas (sections 3.8, 3.9) The chemical formula subscripts of a compound tell you the mole ratio between elements in the compound. 1 mole of C2H6O contains _____moles C, _____ moles H and ____ moles O. Explain how these mole ratios can be used as conversion factors? Watch video tutorial on Blackboard The Empirical Formula of a compound is defined as_________________________________. The Molecular Formula of a compound is defined as________________________________. A compound has the molecular formula C18H12N6. Its empirical formula is ________________. Molecular Formula = Empirical Formula x n What is “n” in this equation? How would you determine the numerical value of “n”? End of Chapter Practice Problems Tro First Edition: #57, 59, 63, 65, 75, 77(a‐b), 85 Tro Second Edition: #55, 57, 61, 65, 75, 77(a‐b), 87 answers are located in Appendix III of the textbook Take the Quiz on Blackboard 2 ...
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course MATH 180 taught by Professor Byrns during the Spring '11 term at Montgomery College.

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