A lifeless object known as a fomite is often involved in disease transmission

A lifeless object known as a fomite is often involved in disease transmission

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A lifeless object known as a fomite is often involved in disease transmission. The object may be a  towel, cup, or eating utensil. Transmission can also be effected by droplet nuclei, bits of mucus and  saliva that spread between individuals.  Vectors are living things. Arthropods such as mosquitoes, flies, and ticks may carry pathogens on  their body parts, in which case they are mechanical vectors. If the arthropod is infected and transmits  the organism in its saliva or feces, it is a biological vector.  Vehicles are lifeless objects such as food, water, and air. Water may be contaminated by human  feces, while food is often contaminated by pathogens from the soil. Air can be a vehicle for  transmission for droplet nuclei in such diseases as tuberculosis and common colds. 
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Pesthy during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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