Earthworms exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide directly through their skin

Earthworms exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide directly through their skin

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Unformatted text preview: Earthworms exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide directly through their skin. The oxygen diffuses into tiny blood vessels in the skin surface, where it combines with the red pigment hemoglobin. Hemoglobin binds loosely to oxygen and carries it through the animal's bloodstream. Carbon dioxide is transported back to the skin by the hemoglobin. Terrestrial arthropods have a series of openings called spiracles at the body surface. Spiracles open into tiny air tubes called tracheae , which expand into fine branches that extend into all parts of the arthropod body. Fishes use outward extensions of their body surface called gills for gas exchange. Gills are flaps of tissue richly supplied with blood vessels. As a fish swims, it draws water into its mouth and across the gills. Oxygen diffuses out of the water into the blood vessels of the gill, while carbon dioxide the gills....
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Pesthy during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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