Censorship Essay - by anyone Public libraries do not have...

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Samantha Knee Where is Captain Underpants ? Can you imagine walking into a public library looking for a specific book and not being able to find it because it was banned? Public library books should not be censored because it goes against the First Amendment’s freedom of speech. People have the constitutional right to read and say what they want, and public libraries have the constitutional right and duty to provide all things written by anyone. People have the constitutional right to read and say what they want. When writing is censored, it takes away the writers freedom of speech, and the reader’s freedom to read. Some may argue that not all people should be exposed to certain things. When someone is aware about what they are reading, that means that they are prepared to read about it, and if they do not understand what they are reading they will not read it (Krug 3). Public libraries have the constitutional right and duty to provide all things written
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Unformatted text preview: by anyone. Public libraries do not have the right to censor because they are public for everyone who walks through their door. Public libraries have a duty to supply all opinions and views on different subjects and topics. The American Library Association contends, “Captain Underpants [a] series by Dav Pilkey, [was challenged] for anti-family content, unsuitability for age group, and violence” (Manzo 5). Having this book challenged goes against the First Amendment’s freedom of speech. We as citizens of the United States of America have the constitutional right to walk into a public library and have books available to read regardless of the topic. The public has a constitutional right to read and say what they want, and public libraries have the right and duty to provide all things written by anyone. Censoring public library books goes against the First Amendment’s freedom of speech....
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This essay was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course ANTH 103 taught by Professor Neitzel during the Spring '08 term at University of Delaware.

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Censorship Essay - by anyone Public libraries do not have...

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