Nutrition in Animals

Nutrition in Animals - Nutrition in Animals

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Nutrition in Animals The nutritional requirements of most animals are relatively extensive and complex compared with the  simple requirements of plants. The nutrients used by animals include carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic  acids, proteins, minerals, and vitamins. Carbohydrates  are the basic source of energy for all animals. Animals obtain their  carbohydrates from the external environment (compared with plants, which synthesize  carbohydrates by photosynthesis). About one-half to two-thirds of the total calories every  animal consumes daily are from carbohydrates.  Glucose  is the carbohydrate most often  used as an energy source. This monosaccharide is metabolized during cellular respiration  and part of the energy is used to synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Other useful  carbohydrates are maltose, lactose, sucrose, and starch.  Lipids  are used to form cellular and organelle membranes, the sheaths surrounding 
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Pesthy during the Fall '07 term at Texas State.

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Nutrition in Animals - Nutrition in Animals

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