intro - Sophomore organic NMR: -1D, 1H spectra -small...

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This course: -what gives rise to the signals; microscopic and macroscopic -what determines signal frequencies, intensities and multiplicities (chemical shifts/couplings/relaxation) -how are spectra acquired and processed (pulsed Fourier transform methods) -how can we manipulate nuclear magnetism to get other types of information (complex pulse sequences) -2D methods / chemical shift correlation (COSY, TOCSY) -the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE, NOESY) -etc. Sophomore organic NMR: -1D, 1 H spectra -small organic molecules -one signal for each type of 1 H -signals split into doublets, triplet, quartets, etc., due to presence of 1 H nuclei on neighboring carbon atoms (“coupling”) -frequencies (“chemical shifts”) of signals determined by electron density
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Most elements are comprised of one or more isotopes that are NMR active http://bouman.chem.georgetown.edu/NMRpt/NMRPerTab.html
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1940s -First observation of nuclear magnetic resonance in solids and liquids (1945) 1950s -Development of chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants as structural tools 1960s -Superconducting magnets
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intro - Sophomore organic NMR: -1D, 1H spectra -small...

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