lec2_4_writing (1)

lec2_4_writing (1) - Writing/Speaking Support for 20.109...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Writing/Speaking Support for 20.109 Neal Lerner Atissa Banuazizi Some summary comments on Mod. 1 Portfolios, Parts 1 and 4 Audience : Imagine for both the editorial rebuttal and the business plan that your reader is a fairly general one, i.e., not familiar with the assignment or its context. Rebuttal : You’ll need to explain/summarize fully the point that you are rebutting (to be fair, at least). Business plan : Write as if you’re proposing to an outside funding source, one not necessarily familiar with the Registry and its context. Justification : Rebuttal : Be sure to justify why it is important to draw a distinction between genetic engineering and biological engineering (i.e., answer the readers’ “why should I care?” question). Business plan : Be sure to focus on a problem that your plan is the solution for. If everything is working well, why propose a change? I’d be glad to conference with you to talk about your revision! 1 Cite as: Natalie Kuldell. Course materials for 20.109 Laboratory Fundamentals in Biological Engineering, Fall 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY].
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What do you as a reader expect to happen in a research article? An abstract (summarizes the paper quickly) In the intro, a summary of the area, why the problem is important. Results! A methods that allows another to replicate the experiment. Background information to give context. Some sort of conclusion based on the results. Figures that summarize the data. References to previous research. A summary (to remind me of what’s important and what the “take- home message” is. Discussion that explains the results. Order and cohesiveness to all of this. A Brief History of the Research Article from Swales (1990) Mid-17th century: Robert Boyle presents his pneumatic experiments to the Royal Society, public presentations before “witnesses” in order to seek agreement on the results. 1665: The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society is established, the first scientific periodical. By 1800 “the definition of experiment moves from any made or done thing, to an intentional investigation, to a test of theory, to finally a proof of evidence for a claim” (Bazerman 1983). By 1900, the current format of research article is largely established. Courtesy of Princeton University Press. Used with permission. 2 Cite as: Natalie Kuldell. Course materials for 20.109 Laboratory Fundamentals in Biological Engineering, Fall 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY].
Background image of page 2
The research process and writing process share essential stages. Research involves:
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Spring '06
  • LindaGriffith
  • MIT OpenCourseWare, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Alex Drake, Biological Engineering, Natalie Kuldell

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 11

lec2_4_writing (1) - Writing/Speaking Support for 20.109...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online