ch3_missing_orga

ch3_missing_orga - The problem of the missing organ 1....

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Unformatted text preview: The problem of the missing organ 1. Irreversible injury (acute and chronic) destroys organ function. 2. Five basic therapies for the missing organ. 3. Examples of widespread clinical problems that have not been solved adequately. Additional reading : [TORA] Tissue and Organ Regeneration in Adults (TORA) , by I.V.Yannas, New York, Springer, 2001 . Chap. 1. 1. Irreversible injury (acute and chronic) destroys organ function. Various Medical Problems The aggressive bacterium (virus) The missing enzyme The defective gene The missing organ Irreversible organ injury The mammalian fetus regenerates lost organs spontaneously. Adult mammals do not regenerate damaged or diseased organs. The adult response to trauma or chronic disease includes wound closure by contraction and formation of scar (repair). Amphibian (newt) limbs regenerate spontaneously 4 1. The Irreversibility of Injury Figure 1.1. Montage of individual newt limbs amputated across the lower or upper arms, photographed at indicated times and regenerating spontaneously. (From Goss, 1992.) Figure removed due to copyright restrictions. See Figure 1.1 in [TORA]. Liver: compensatory hypertrophy, not real regeneration of two lobes All Organs Can Be Irreversibly Injured FIGURE 1.2. Liver does not regenerate at the anatomical site of injury. When the median and left lateral lobes of a rat liver are removed (broken line shows shape of intact organ), only the caudate and right lateral lobes remain, representing about one-third of the intact organ. After three weeks, these lobes enlarge to a mass equivalent to the initial size of the liver. The shape of the intact liver is not restored. (From Goss, 1992.) Figure removed due to copyright restrictions. See Figure 1.2 in [TORA]. Example of adult healing response . Severe burn causes skin loss. Wound closes by contraction and scar synthesis Photo removed due to copyright restrictions. Figure removed due to copyright restrictions. See Chapter 1 in [TORA] - examples of injury healing in various tissue types. Poor organ function leads to unpleasant choices--- scarred heart muscle: poor pumping action; congestive heart failure; drugs, heart transplant--- scarred kidney: poor filtration; use kidney dialysis machine--- scarred heart valve: inefficient pumping due to leaky valve; congestive heart failure--- scarred liver: cirrhosis; poor function; liver transplant--- scarred eye: loss of vision 2. Five therapies for the missing organ.organ....
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ch3_missing_orga - The problem of the missing organ 1....

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