lec_24_slid_mig

Lec_24_slid_mig - Cell 112 453-465(21 Feb 2003 One scenario for how myosin movement along the actin matrix can give rise to matrix contraction

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Phases of Cell Migration • Polarization • Protrusion and adhesion • Contraction • Rear release Images removed due to copyright considerations.
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Staining for actin (green) and myosin II (red) in a migrating cell. Image removed due to copyright considerations.
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Yellow indicates the location of myosin II tethered to the actin matrix in a migrating cell. Actin polymerization generally occurs at the protruding membrane of a migrating cell. Image removed due to copyright considerations. Image removed due to copyright considerations.
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Image removed due to copyright considerations. See Figure 1 in Pollard, T. D., and G. G. Borisy. "Cellular Motility Driven by Assembly and Disassembly of Actin Filaments."
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Unformatted text preview: Cell 112: 453-465 (21 Feb 2003). One scenario for how myosin movement along the actin matrix can give rise to matrix contraction. bipolar myosin II actin filament Cell migration patterns. In the absence of an external signal (e.g., chemoattractant gradient), the migration pattern resembles a random walk. Migration speed tends to vary inversely with persistence time. Migration speed first increases, then falls as the strength of attachment is increased. Cilia Cilia beating on the surface of an airway epithelial cell. Images removed due to copyright considerations....
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course BIO 20.410j taught by Professor Rogerd.kamm during the Spring '03 term at MIT.

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Lec_24_slid_mig - Cell 112 453-465(21 Feb 2003 One scenario for how myosin movement along the actin matrix can give rise to matrix contraction

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