7_340_9

7_340_9 - How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses Session 09:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Marie-Eve Paquet and Gijsbert Grotenbreg Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research Under the Radar Screen: How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses Session 09: Molecular mimicry
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The ‘missing-self’ hypothesis and Natural Killer Cells Adapted from Lodoen et al. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2005 9(10):59-69 According to the ‘missing-self ’ hypothesis, one function of NK cells is to recognize and eliminate cells that fail to express ‘self ’ MHC class I molecules. The ‘missing-self hypothesis’ postulates that NK cells are activated to kill target cells, including tumor and virus-infected cells, when the NK cell encounters a host cell that lacks ‘self ’ class I MHC. A contemporary view of the ‘missing-self hypothesis’ postulates that NK cell responses are regulated by the integration of signals from both their activating and inhibitory receptors This weeks papers are at the crossroads of these two views !!
Background image of page 2
Recap: Possible activating signals for NK cells
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course BIO 7.344 taught by Professor Bobsauer during the Spring '08 term at MIT.

Page1 / 7

7_340_9 - How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses Session 09:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online