cable_tlingit

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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 24.941J / 6.543J / 9.587J / HST.727J The Lexicon and Its Features Spring 2007 For information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.mit.edu/terms .
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Seth Cable December 9, 2004 Iterative Rounding Spread in Tlingit [Lingít]: A Puzzle for Theories of Contrast 1. Introduction Questions raised by the process of iterative rounding spread in Tlingit [Lingít] : What does it mean for a feature to be contrastive in a given environment? What does it mean for two segments to contrast with respect to a given feature? What’s the problem? Consonantal segments behave differently from non-consonantals with respect to Lingít’s process of iterative rounding spread. There is a “very natural intuition” that the difference is due to a subtle difference in how consonantals and non- consonantals are organized into contrasting pairs. More specifically, I seek a principled explanation of why consonantal and non- consonantal segments behave differently with respect to Lingít’s process of iterative rounding spread. Interestingly, it’s very difficult to state such an account within the language of serious, contemporary phonological theories of features and featural composition of segments. This is despite the fact that the rule is a simple one to state intuitively, and is a very easy part of the Lingít accent to pick up on and mimic. 2. Segmental Inventory of Lingít Vowels: Representation in IPA follows the representation in Lingít orthography. Front Central Back long/tense High short/lax ee [ ] i [ I ] oo [ ] u [ U ] long/tense Mid short/lax ei [ ] e [ E ] a [ ] long/tense Low short/lax aa [ ] 1
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Consonants: Representation in IPA follows representation in Lingít orthography. Alveolar Lateral Palatal plain Stop aspirated glottalized d [ t ] t [ tH ] t’ [ t' ] plain Affricate aspirated glottalized dz [ ts ] ts [ tsH ] ts’ [ ts' ] dl [ t… ] tl [ t…H ] tl’ [ t…' ] j [ tS ] ch [ tSH ] ch’ [ tS' ] plain Fricative glottalized s [ s ] s’ [ s' ] l [ ] l’ [ …' ] sh [ S ] Nasal n [ n ] Glide y [ j ] Velar plain round Uvular plain round Glottal plain round plain Stop aspirated glottalized g [ k ] gw [ kW ] k [ kH ] kw [ kHW ] k’ [ k' ] k’w [ k'W ] g [ q ] g w [ qW ] k [ qH ] k w [ qHW ] k [ q' ] k ’w [ q'W ] . [ / ] (.w [ / w ]) plain Fricative glottalized x [ x ] xw [ xW ] x’ [ x' ] x’w [ x'W ] x [ X ] x w [ XW ] x [ X' ] x ’w [ X'W ] h [ h ] (hw [ hW ]) Glide w [ w ] 2
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There are thus 14 rounded segments in Lingít, which may be paired with 14 unrounded “counterparts”. w gw kw k’w g w k w k ’w xw x’w x w x ’w hw oo u y g k k’ g k k x x’ x x h ee i 3. The Rule of Iterative Rounding Spread A. Stated as a Simple, Intuitive Rule: If a rounded segment precedes a segment S with a rounded “counterpart”, then S is replaced with its rounded counterpart. (iterate until it can no longer apply) B. Stated as a Surface Generalization:
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cable_tlingit - MIT OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.mit.edu...

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