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pd_memory_intro

pd_memory_intro - Parkinsons disease and Memory Christie...

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Parkinson’s disease and Memory Christie Chung 8/2/06
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PD and Memory PD without dementia impairs declarative memory processes Recall Recognition (Recollection and Familiarity) Prospective memory Metamemory Moderators: task difficulty, disease severity, depression
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Recall in nondemented PD PD impairs both verbal and nonverbal recall (Bowen et al., 1976; Halgin, 1977; Cooper et al., 1993) Especially when information is not semantically organized (Tweedy et al., 1982; Villardita et al., 1982; Weingartner et al., 1984)
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Recall deficit in PD Recall deficit is present in early-onset PD and is not worse in the late-onset form of the disease Deficit also observed in early, untreated PD Dopaminergic and cholinergic neuronal systems influence acquisition and retrieval of information in PD, but not storage of information (challenged view!)
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Recognition in PD Mixed results: Some found no deficit in recognition (e.g., Flowers et al.,1984; Taylor et al., 1986) Others found decline (e.g., Tweedy et al., 1982; Hay et al., 2002; Davidson et al., 2006)
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Why mixed results? Floor or ceiling effects? Statistical power (Whittington et al., 2000) 48 studies, mean power to detect small effects was 20% ( Type II error) Meta-analysis showed small deficits in recognition in nondemented PD patients
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Dual-process models Recognition based on two processes: 1) Recollection -- vivid, clear memory of an item and context around it 2) Familiarity -- intuitive feeling of encountering the item without awareness of context
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Brain regions implicated Recollection -- both frontal and hippocampus proper Familiarity -- parahippocampal and perirhinal cortex PD: Mesocortical pathway deficits, dysfunction of connections between the basal ganglia and temporal lobes, and reduced MTL volume leads to prediction of recollection and familiarity decline
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Recollection and Familiarity in PD Hay et al. (2002) used Process Dissociation Task (PDP) to estimate recollection and familiarity in PD and amnesia (MTL lesion) Moderate PD patients showed impairment in recollection (frontal) and familairity (striatal dysfunction) compared to controls and mild PD patients Amnesics showed impairment in recollection and
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