Lecture+9+-+Family+Relationships

Lecture+9+-+Family+Relationships - Family Rela*onships...

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Unformatted text preview: Family Rela*onships Reading for Thursday - 10/6 • CMC Ch. 15 • Response I due at the beginning of class. 2 Family Ties • What is family today? (Nielsen, 2011) – The white, two- parent, “Leave It to Beaver” family unit of the 1950s has evolved into a mulO- layered, mulO- cultural construct dominated by older, childless households. – In 1960,72 percent of the adult populaOon was married. • By 2008, that number plummeted to 52 percent. – 40 percent of households are mulO- cultural – Three- screen lives dominate 3 Provider Role Systems • Main/Secondary provider couple - providing is the man’s responsibility, the home is the woman’s. • Co- provider couple - both partners are equally responsible for providing. • Ambivalent provider couple - wife’s providing responsibiliOes are not clearly acknowledged. • Role- reversed provider couple - husband is responsible for homemaking and child care while the wife is the principle breadwinner. • Commuter couples - commiZed relaOonship / marriage maintained over a significant distance 4 Single-Earner to Dual-Earner Marriages • In early twenOeth century, few wives worked outside home – Earned money—boarders, lodgers, piecework • By mid- twenOeth century women withdrew from any outside work – Only one paid worker—the man – 1950s high point of single- earner, two parent family – The “good provider role” emerged in the the 1830’s and lasted through the late 1970’s – In 2000, only 20% of men in married- couple families were the sole breadwinner compared with 42% in 1960 5 Men & Women at Work Today • Common for women to work outside the home from young adulthood to reOrement • Large number of unmarried mothers that need income • Women sOll earn substanOally less than men – Parity: Equal work for equal wages – 77% in today’s dollars (2002) 6 Managing the Household • Data from about 8,500 parOcipants in a 2003 University of Michigan study found: – Women spend 27 hours a week on housework compared to 40 hours in 1965. – Men increased their housework Ome from 12 hours in 1965 to 16 hours in 1999. • Wives’ ability to exchange labor for goods and services may be limited because they must also carry out childcare and household responsibiliOes. – Women with children typically earn less than women without children 7 Managing the Household • Data from about 8,500 parOcipants in a 2003 University of Michigan study found: – Women spend 27 hours a week on housework compared to 40 hours in 1965. – Men increased their housework Ome from 12 hours in 1965 to 16 hours in 1999. • Wives’ ability to exchange labor for goods and services may be limited because they must also carry out childcare and household responsibiliOes. – Women with children typically earn less than women without children 8 Work/Life Balance • May be more difficult because people are working longer hours – Those with a college educaOon are working more hours – Those with non- college educaOon are working fewer hours • More part- Ome workers without fringe benefits • 9 Work/Life Balance • Blending public & private – Census data from 1979 to 2008 found that for a typical child since 1979, parents' work hours have increased 12% in a two- parent family and 23% in a single- parent family – 45% of children have had both parents working full Ome; 22% had at least one parent home part Ome; and 33% had at least one parent home full Ome – Nearly half of Americans bring work home with them – Turkle: • shared aZenOon 10 Growing up Online • Growing Up Online – – – – – – CommunicaOng with family members School CommunicaOng with friends and students from school IdenOty management of adolescents Predators Social support • The Internet does not necessarily create all these things, but rather allows them to take place or, someOmes, promotes them. 11 ...
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course COMMUNICAT 192:354 taught by Professor Weber during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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