History+of+PR+-+PRP-TNBW032

History+of+PR+-+PRP-TNBW032 - Today we have powerful tools...

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Today, we have powerful tools unimagined even 100 years ago Principles of Public Relations  © 2009  John A. Grasso  1
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“Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it, nothing can succeed. Consequently, he who moulds (sic) public sentiment goes deeper than he who enacts statutes or pronounces decisions.” Abraham Lincoln Principles of Public Relations © 2009 John A. Grasso 2 PR History
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Principles of Public Relations  © 2009  John A. Grasso  3 The public be damned!
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Earliest examples of corporations becoming aware of public interest: The Borden Company issued a financial report to its stockholders (1858) Theodore Vail of AT&T instructed his local managers to examine the quality of service and pricing to their customers (1883) Principles of Public Relations © 2009 John A. Grasso 4 PR History
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Historical Figures Ivy Lee (1877 - 1934) Established First Code of Ethics Edward Bernays (1891 – 1995) Coined the term “Public Relations”
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2011 for the course COMMUNICAT 04:192:365 taught by Professor Jackgrasso during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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History+of+PR+-+PRP-TNBW032 - Today we have powerful tools...

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