21+Hamlet+1 - Hamlet from the ancient story Amleth a 12th...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hamlet , from the ancient story Amleth, a 12 th Century Viking tale in Saxo Grammaticus's Historiae Danicae (or Danish Histories ), made popular in a French story in Belleforest's Histoires Tragiques , printed in French in 1570, 1572, 1576, and 1582. One English translation, The Hystorie of Hamblet , was published in 1608, though an English translation probably circulated earlier.
Image of page 2
In the original story, the Claudius character murders his brother openly, in front of the court. Belleforest relates that "insteed of pursuing him as a parricide and an incestuous person, al the courtyers admired and flattered him in his good fortune." Gertrude is also a knowing accomplice in the murder. Belleforest and Saxo cast Rosencrantz and Guildenstern as knowing accomplices to Claudius.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In Shakespeare’s sources, Ophelia is a hired spy. The Hystorie of Hamblet (1608) renders it: "they could find no better nor more fit invention to entrap him, then to set some faire and beautiful woman in a secret place. . ." See Geoffrey Bullough, Narrative and Dramatic Sources of Shakespeare , (New York, Columbia University Press, 1975), pp. 7, 67 & 102.
Image of page 4
The Mysterious “Ur-Hamlet ,” ca. 1589, a lost play sometimes attributed to Shakespeare. (This lost source is called the “Ur- Hamlet ,” because of the city of Ur (now in Iraq!), the “source” of Abraham; hence, the source of many religions.)
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“Ur-”Hamlet (ca. 1589) lost play referred to in Thomas Nashe’s Preface to Robert Greene’s Menaphon (1589).
Image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern