5.1.+Macbeth+1 - “Fate and Metaphysical Aid” Jacobean...

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Unformatted text preview: “Fate and Metaphysical Aid” Jacobean Shakespeare: Macbeth , Lecture 1 BBC Macbeth 1983 Macbeth’s Context Banquo, ancestor of James I, was an 11th Century Thane when Macbeth Ruled Scotland. Gunpowder Plot, November 5, 1605 “Guy Fawkes Day” Raphael Holinshed, The Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1577) Orson Wells’ Macbeth (1948) Roman Polanski’s Macbeth (1971) p. 7: Thunder and Lightning. Enter three witches FIRST WITCH: Where the place? SECOND WITCH: Upon the heath. THIRD WITCH: There to meet with Macbeth. FIRST WITCH: I come, Graymalkin! SECOND WITCH: Paddock calls:- anon! ALL: Fair is foul, and foul is fair: Hover through the fog and filthy air. p. 17: 1.3.49: First words of Macbeth [opening scene with Witches:] Fair is foul, and foul is fair. MACBETH: So fair and foul a day I have not seen. Orson Wells’ Macbeth (1948) Macbeth calls Witches “Weird Sisters” “Weird” comes from the Old English word “WYRD,” fate. p. 9: 1.2.18ff: Macbeth Described as Warrior CAPTAIN : For brave Macbeth, well he deserves that name, Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel, Which smoked with bloody execution, Like valour's minion, carved out his passage Till he faced the slave; [ i.e., the villain ] Which ne'er shook hands, nor bade farewell to him, Till he unseam'd him from the nave to p. 13: 1.2.68ff: 11th-century Warrior Ethics, Vikings Attack Britain ROSS: That now Sweno, The Norways' king, craves composition. Nor would we deign him burial of his men Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's-inch Ten thousand dollars to our general use. DUNCAN: No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive Our bosom interest. Go, pronounce his present death, p. 13: 1.2.68ff: 11th-century Warrior Ethics, Vikings Attack Britain ROSS: That now Sweno, The Norways' king, craves composition. Nor would we deign him burial of his men Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's-inch Ten thousand dollars to our general use. DUNCAN: No more that thane of Cawdor shall deceive Our bosom interest. Go, pronounce his present death, p. 17: 1.3.51ff: Macbeth and Banquo receive prophecy FIRST WITCH : All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, thane of Glamis!...
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2011 for the course ENGLISH 350:323 taught by Professor Fulton during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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5.1.+Macbeth+1 - “Fate and Metaphysical Aid” Jacobean...

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