7.1+Winter_s+Tale

7.1+Winter_s+Tale - From Late Tragedy to Late Romance...

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From Late Tragedy to Late Romance Winter’s Tale Lecture 1
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P.267 of Antony and Cleopatra , 5.2.335ff CLEOPATRA : I have Immortal longings in me… Methinks I hear Antony call; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble act; I hear him mock The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath: husband, I come
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Late Romance: Mixture of Generes Shakespeare develops this fusion of tragic passions and themes (sexual jealousy in Winter’s Tale , political betrayal in Tempest ) and comedic transformation, regeneration, and reunion into a new genre altogether: the tragicomic romance . But … What is Romance? Romance does not mean “Love Story” ! Romance or Chivalric Romance = Medieval story of questing knights,
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“Romance” in Shakespearean Sense First named “Romances” in Edward Dowden, Shakespeare: A Critical Study of His Mind and Art (1875) The Late Romances , or the Romances include Pericles, Prince of Tyre Cymbeline The Winter’s Tale The Tempest Two Noble Kinsmen (sometimes)
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Genre of Romance A redemptive plotline with a happy ending involving the re-uniting of long-separated family members; Magic and other fantastical elements; A deus ex machina , frequently manifesting as figures from classical myth A mixture of "civilized" and " pastoral " scenes Poetry is a return to the lyrical style of pre- 1600 Story has long journeys over space and time
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Exit, pursued by a bear. (Most famous stage direction in Shakespeare, in Act 3 scene 3)
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EXIT, PURSUED BY A BEAR
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Pp. 7-9: 1.1.19FF Sicilia CAMILLO : Sicilia cannot show himself over-kind to Bohemia: They were train'd together in their childhoods; and there rooted betwixt them such an [p. 9] affection, which cannot choose but branch now. …. The heavens continue their loves! ARCHIDAMIUS : I think there is not in the world either malice or matter to alter it.
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pp. 9-11; 1.2.1 FF POLIXENES : Nine changes of the watery star hath been The shepherd's note since we have left our throne Without a burden: time as long again [p. 11] Would be fill'd up, my brother, with our thanks; And yet we should, for perpetuity, Go hence in debt: and therefore, like a cipher,
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p. 11, 1.2.11: Polixenes back to Bohemia LEONTES : Stay your thanks awhile, And pay them when you part. POLIXENES
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2011 for the course ENGLISH 350:323 taught by Professor Fulton during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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7.1+Winter_s+Tale - From Late Tragedy to Late Romance...

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