Shakespeare+Writing+Guidelines

Shakespeare+Writing+Guidelines - Guidelines for Writing an...

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Unformatted text preview: Guidelines for Writing an English Paper Professor Fulton A paper should present an original argument in a lively and concise statement. Your discussion should go beyond book-report repetition of facts about the story, to develop an analytical reading rather than a summary report. Refer consistently to events and passages in the text -- quoting the language of the text -- to support your interpretations. Assume your reader has read the play or sonnet: this will save you from having to go over summaries of storyline and plot. Concentrate instead on your creative response to the play. A successful paper will: 1. Have a clearly stated, adventuresome and original thesis. 2. Develop the thesis with specific references to the text. 3. Present a conclusion that shows how the paper has developed and supported the thesis. Mechanical points Always include a reference to the page number of a passage you are quoting, or, if a play, the act, scene, and line number. Often, it is best to weave small amounts of words from Shakespeares text into your writing, such as: Leontes describes his wife in strangely comic terms, such as a hobby horse, a bed-presser, and slippery, as rank as any flax wench (1.2.276-7) that seem to be designed to make the and slippery, as rank as any flax wench (1....
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2011 for the course ENGLISH 350:323 taught by Professor Fulton during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Shakespeare+Writing+Guidelines - Guidelines for Writing an...

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