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c161l12_09_28b - Stoichiometry and Gases W Moles gases can...

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Putting it all together: the Putting it all together: the Ideal Gas Law Ideal Gas Law W PV = nRT Greater V, fewer collisions, less pressure More particles, more collisions, greater pressure Higher temperature, faster particles, more frequent collisions, more pressure W R is the gas constant Use the correct value of R for the units you are using R = 0.08206 L atm mol -1 K -1 R = 8.3145 J mol -1 K -1 Pa m Pa m 3 = kg m = kg m - 1 s - 2 m 3 = kg m = kg m 2 s - 2 = J = J
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How to Use the Ideal Gas How to Use the Ideal Gas Law Law W Convert pressure to atm (or Pa) W Convert volume to L (or m 3 ) W Convert temperature to K
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Example Example W What volume does 1 mol occupy at 27 °C and 1 atm? 1 atm V = 1 mol (0.08206 L atm mol -1 K -1 ) (27 + 273.15) V = 24.63L W We can ask about number of moles (mass), volume, pressure or temperature.
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More on the Ideal Gas Law More on the Ideal Gas Law W PV = nRT W Questions we can answer number of moles pressure volume temperature mass (to moles)
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Related questions Related questions W Determine the molar mass of a gas PV = mRT/M M = mRT/(PV) = dRT/P (more later)
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Stoichiometry and Gases
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Unformatted text preview: Stoichiometry and Gases W Moles gases can be related to other measurable quantities through the ideal gas law volume pressure W Moles related to moles by stoichiometry Example Example W How much KO 2 is needed to react with 50L of CO 2 at a pressure of 1 atm at 25 °C? W Step 1: Balanced reaction 4KO 2 (s) + 2CO 2 (g) → 2K 2 CO 3 (s) + 3O 2 (g) W Step 2: Find the number of moles of CO 2 (g) n=PV/RT= 1 atm 50 L/(0.08206 L atm mol-1 K-1 298.15K) n=2.0 mol W Step 3: Relate moles by stoichiometry 2 mol CO 2 = 4 mol KO 2 W Step 4: Moles back to mass 4 mol KO 2 (71.1 g/mol) = 290 g KO 2 Review Review W Chapter 1 Science SI Unit conversion Mixtures W Chapter 2 Conservation of Matter Atomic structure of the atom Atomic masses Isotopes Periodic table Nomenclature and formulae Chapter 3 Chapter 3 W Stoichiometry Mole Molar masses Empirical and molecular formula Combustion analysis W Writing equations Balancing Limiting Reactants % Yield Concentration and dilution...
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