Social Cognition 2011-class

Social Cognition 2011-class - Social Cognition

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Social Cognition “The human mind must think with the aid of  categories…orderly living depends upon it.”  --Allport, 1954
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Introduction Social cognition: How we organize, interpret, remember,  and use social information to make  decisions  A continuum with two ends…
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Introduction Automatic thinking Unintentional, effortless, nonconscious Controlled, intentional Voluntary, effortful
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Purposes of automatic thinking Save time (increase efficiency)  Past experience provides a filter to help us interpret and  evaluate new people and events. Disadvantage = errors (Amadou Diallo, mistook for serial  rapist, reached for wallet, 41 shots) Fitting in  EX: Political candidates: People often make judgments based on party  affiliation without gathering additional information about the candidate.
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Schemas Makes social environment more predictable Help us organize information Can influence behavior
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Schemas People develop theories to interpret reality Examples: Social roles (police, librarians) Social norms (how to act in church) Scripts :
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Schemas influence attention “Graduate Student’s Office” Study IV:  Grad student office included schema  consistent (stapler, filing cabinets, book  shelves) and schema inconsistent  (exercise equipment) objects.   DV:  Leave room and recall what was in  the room.
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Priming
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Priming and impressions Donald example IV:  Priming positive (e.g., brave, confident,  independent) or negative (e.g., reckless, aloof,  conceited) - memorized words DV:  Positivity of impression Positive primes: Negative primes:  10% had positive impression
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Schemas influence behavior Bargh and colleagues IV:  Primed polite, rude, or neutral words  (scrambled sentence task) DV:  How long participant waited to  interrupt the experimenter Results:
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Elderly Stereotype Study Bargh et al. study:  IV:  Primed elderly stereotype (e.g.,  retired,  Florida,   old, wise, bingo, courteous)  or  neutral words (e.g.,  thirsty, clean, private ) –  scrambled sentences  DV:  Assessed walking speed 
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How do we decide which schema to use? Situational cues:  
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course PSYC 2012 taught by Professor Michellestock during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

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Social Cognition 2011-class - Social Cognition

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